Tag Archives: experiment

Exhibition Time!

23 Jun

I’ve been more proactive this year in applying for exhibitions and trying to get my work seen by a wider audience, and although it costs to submit work, so far it seems to be paying off as I have three events coming up in the next few months!

I’ll be showing three pieces of work at next weeks’ Royal Norfolk Show, 28th and 29th of June, this is my third year of taking part and as I sold both works last year I have been invited to submit three this time… On show will be my latest etching of Granddad and friends – ‘The MG’, as well as ‘Millicent’- a portrait of my Grandma and an early etching of mine – ‘Granddad’.

I’m excited to have recently found out that ‘The MG’ has also been shortlisted for the Holt Festival – Sir John Hurt Art Prize exhibition, 24th -31st July! A great selection of works by local artists will be on show and the prize will be announced by Lady Anwen Hurt on Sunday the 23rd of July!

'The MG' £195 unframed £230 framed

‘The MG’ £195 unframed £230 framed

I’m also taking part in the 22nd (my 5th) Norwich Print Fair from the 4th – 16th of September. For this I’ve been working on some new prints based on ‘the hand-made’ and so far have produced some portraits of volunteers at the John Jarrold Printing Museum. Below are two new prints that are a combination of etching and collagraph, ‘Bill’ and ‘Jerry’.

I’m still waiting to hear if I have got into the Woolwich Print Fair in London, 20th – 23rd October… Watch this space!

Thanks for reading…

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Courses at Print to the People

17 Mar

There are a number of courses now open for bookings at Print to the People, Norwich, over the next few months. With a bigger team of printmaking tutors, we now have more processes for you to try and some of the courses book up really fast so be sure to book now!

We also have an online ‘shop’ on our website where there is more info and images of each course and you can book directly from there… here’s the link!

http://printtothepeople.com/shop

Courses i’m teaching on include lino printing, muliple block printing, collagraph for beginners, drypoint and etching! Spaces still available !!

PRINTMAKING COURSES – SUMMER TERM!

24 Mar

Printmaking Courses at Wensum Lodge, King Street, Norwich!

https://enrol.norfolk.gov.uk/  … Just type ‘printmaking’ into the key word box!!

 

Summer Term and from September:

Intaglio for Beginners – Dry point and etching:

Monday evenings 6-8pm 12 weeks

Printmaking Intermediate – Monoprint, lino cut, collagaraph and drypoint

Tuesday afternoons 3-5pm 12 weeks

Summer Term only: 

Lev 1 Printmaking – Accredited course covering design, sampling, monoprint, collagraph, lino cut

Friday afternoons 3-6pm 12 weeks

From September:

Lino Cut for Beginners – single and reductive lino cut

Monday afternoons 2-4pm 12 weeks

Level 2 Printmaking – Accredited course covering research for design, sampling techniques, collagraph and lino cut

Tuesday evenings 6.30-9.30 pm 37 weeks (1 year)

Level 3 C & G Printmaking – Accredited course covering research for design, sampling techniques, drypoint and multiple block lino cut

Friday mornings 9am-1pm 37 weeks (1 year)

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Rocking a Mezzotint

19 Aug

I started preparing a copper plate for a new mezzotint this week.  This process is quite long winded and involves passing a ‘rocker’ across the plate in at least 20 different directions. 

Rocking a mezzotint

Rocking a mezzotint

The rocker is a curved tool with tiny teeth that are designed to leave a row of dots on the metal surface that will hold ink. 

Rocking a mezzotint

Rocking a mezzotint

By ‘rocking’ the plate in several directions the surface becomes rough and covered in burs that will now hold ink and if printed at this stage the plate should print a velvet black.

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To create the image the rough burs are then scraped away and burnished to create lighter tones that will hold less ink.

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Below is a reminder of my willow tree mezzotint plate and the print taken from it.  This was one of my first successful mezzotints, and i’m glad to have finally got round to trying this method again! (however long it may take me!)

Willow tree Mezzotint in progress, this shows the mere foundations of where i've started to map out the image.  At this angle it looks like it's printable but there's a lot more work to do before it can be proofed!

Willow tree Mezzotint in progress, this shows the mere foundations of where i’ve started to map out the image. At this angle it looks like it’s printable but there’s a lot more work to do before it can be proofed!

 

It's almost there, I just want to define the edges a bit more and add some more highlights.

It’s almost there, I just want to define the edges a bit more and add some more highlights.

Monoprint/Etching experiments

18 Aug

I have recently started experimenting with the idea of the ‘multiple’ by playing around with an old etching and printing over the top of monoprints.  I bought myself a beautiful book called ‘Wildlife in Printmaking’ and came across some amazing monoprints which inspired me to consider using this technique more in my own work.

There are six main methods of monoprinting, some of which are more controlled, but on the whole the great (or perhaps frustrating) thing is that you never quite know what you’re going to get!

Different methods:

1. Positive – Rolling out a thin layer of ink, placing your paper onto the ink and drawing directly onto the back

2. Negative – After taking your positive print, place a new piece of paper onto the ink and rub.  This should pick up the negative marks.

3. Stencil – Using shapes to block areas of the rolled out ink. Also can be flipped over and double printed/layered.

4. Painterly – Painting the ink onto surface using different brushes and tools, laying the paper down and rubbing the back.

5. Reductive – Rolling out the ink and then using different tools e.g. pallet knife or end of a paintbrush to remove ink and make different marks before laying paper over and rubbing.

6. Found objects – Using materials, fabrics, bubble wrap, sand, folded paper etc to take ink away.  Then perhaps flip the materials over to pick up ink from the different textures.

Below are some of the examples of my experiments using stencils for my monoprints.  As you can see they come out quite differently each time!

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